Our Clinical Team

The Harris School's Therapeutic Program

In addition to an individualized academic curriculum, The Harris School provides therapeutic support and interventions to students and their families.  This includes weekly therapy sessions with each family, a parent support group, childrens groups, and classroom support. Our clinical team values working collaboratively with parents, teachers, administrators, outside clinicians and behavioral specialists.

The short term goals of the therapeutic program are to provide the students with a school environment that is less stressful, more positive and better equipped to meet their individual needs; provide immediate support for discouraged parents; and provide information regarding mental health issues and strategies to address the issues.

The long term goals are children who can successfully transition into a more mainstream academic environment, equipped with coping strategies, new patterns of thinking and a more positive attitude; better functioning family systems; and better understanding and tolerance of mental health issues.

Clinical Staff

Robert Ziegler, LCSW

ext. 304 
bobz@theharrisschoo.org

Bob began at The Harris School as a classroom teacher in 2002, a position he maintained for four years.  After completing his clinical education and training, he returned as a therapist and has been in this role for the last ten years.  He received his Master of Social Work degree from The Graduate School of Social Work at The University of Houston.

While pursuing this degree, Bob completed a one-year internship at the Baylor Psychiatry Clinic where he deepened his knowledge of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy and studied Cognitive Behavioral interventions.  He then went on to complete a two-year fellowship in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy at the Center for Psychoanalytic Studies in Houston.  In addition to his work at The Harris School, Bob has a private practice focusing on children, adolescents, adults and families.  Bob’s areas of interest include Oppositional Defiant Disorder, family dynamics, anxiety and depression. Bob also focuses on adolescent group therapy and parent support groups.  He is trained to work collaboratively with families as a member of an interdisciplinary team to understand behavior, what it means, and to create effective interventions for children and families.  Additionally he is trained to supervise social work interns and is helping to create a fellowship program for aspiring clinicians at The Harris School.

Alane Atchley, 

LMFT, LCDC

ext. 303
alanea@theharrisschool.org

Alane received her Bachelor of Science degree in Community, Family and Addiction Sciences and her Master of Science degree in Marriage and Family Therapy from Texas Tech University. She has worked in a variety of settings with children of all ages. Throughout her undergraduate studies, she worked as a victim advocate for a crisis center in Lubbock, Texas. During her graduate studies, Alane facilitated groups with preteens and teens; completed a clinical practicum at ECI DEBT of Lubbock Independent School conducting family therapy and providing developmental services to children from birth to 3 years of age; and provided individual, family and couples therapy at the Texas Tech Family Therapy Clinic. Presently Alane is an Intermediate Theraplay Practitioner and is trained in Group Theraplay Principles. She trained at the TCU Institute of Child Development in Trust Based Relational Intervention and is a TBRI Educator Practitioner.
 
Alane's therapeutic focus is based on building attunement, attachment and emotional regulation within children and their families. She uses an integrated approach combining many systemic theories into her practice. Alane views each family as a whole system and views the parents/ caregivers as a crucial agent of change for the child. She believes that maladaptive behavior is simply a symptom of an unmet need of the child. Alane has a part-time private practice where she works with children under 12 who struggle with attachment and/or regulation issues, often as a result of relational and/ or developmental trauma.